Mental Health & Coping Techniques For Work

There is still a huge stigma around mental health, but especially being taken seriously in your job role by your bosses and/or co-workers. Speaking about your mental health can be such a daunting process.

From my personal experiences, I sometimes feel embarrassed admitting the flaws in my psychological health to others. It’s a big step opening up to others about your own mental well-being, so make sure you reward yourself with something nice which you enjoy doing.

Think about your triggers

Taking the time to work out what the triggers for stress or your mental health worsening can be really useful. By considering what exactly it is that has a negative impact on your mental well-being, you can pin point specific scenarios which you struggle with.

 

Mindfulness can work

Many turn their noses up as soon as mindfulness is mentioned, but from my own personal experiences it can be genuinely helpful. There are plenty of fantastic apps available out there, such as HeadSpace. Take some time to try a few different apps and see if any work for you. I personally find some work much better for me than others.

 

Take a mental health sick day

This one may be tricky for some, but employers have become a lot more understanding with regards to mental health. Many employers now include a percentage of sick days to be used specifically for mental health (if that makes sense). An awesome example can be found below which went viral recently! I love the bosses response to the employee, it’s really heart warming to know people do understand.

 

Remember to take a break

Taking a break from your work load or desk is advisable for a number of good reasons. Obviously don’t push your luck, but by making a cup of tea (if you work in an environment where this is possible) can be just enough time to give you that little break you feel you need.

 

Seek professional/medical help

Some people really struggle with this, which is understandable. You could speak to your manager, your GP, etc or even someone you trust such as a close friend if you just want advice. Try to think about your symptoms and how they shape your day to day life. If you’ve seen a medical professional who you feel doesn’t quite understand you and your symptoms, you can request to see someone different to get another opinion. You may be referred (or be able to self refer) to a mental health service. Although, medical negligence is a completely different matter altogether, it can be something to consider, although with regards to mental health it can be tricky and would require research. You could consider taking an NLP course, to assist in helping yourself and understanding why we act the way we do.

 

Most importantly, don’t be too hard on yourself

I am so guilty of expecting far too much of myself sometimes. Don’t be (or try to be) a perfectionist. I have let my inner-bully beat myself up on so many occasions when I don’t feel in the greatest frame of mind.

 

The experiences and impact of conditions such as anxiety and depression are individual to each person. It’s important to remember that not one persons experience will be identical to someone else’s, therefore how we cope as individuals also differs. Find what works best for YOU. You’ve got this! x

 

Did you enjoy this blog post? If so, you may also like 5 Ways To Practice Self Care.

Disclaimer: This is a sponsored blog post.
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